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dc.contributor.advisorMarriott, Robert A.
dc.contributor.authorMarrugo Hernandez, Juan Javier
dc.date2019-11
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T20:28:23Z
dc.date.available2019-09-10T20:28:23Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-06
dc.identifier.citationMarrugo Hernandez, J. J. (2019). Reactions involving fracturing chemical additives with implication in delayed H2S production (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/110905
dc.description.abstractShale gas is fast becoming the primary source of liquefied natural gas, a must needed fuel in a society trying to lower carbon emissions. When producing shale reservoirs, hydraulic fracturing in combination with horizontal drilling are the chosen technologies to extract hydrocarbons economically and efficiently. An issue faced during production from hot shale gas reservoirs (T > 100 °C) is the presence of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and organo-sulfur compounds (CxHy-SH) in the production fluids. These sulfur species can have a significant economic impact on the overall production as the gas now has to be treated to remove the unwanted components. In this work, the decomposition of selected chemical additives contained within fracturing fluids are investigated as an alternative explanation to the H2S formation in hot shale sweet gas reservoirs. Initially, high-pressure and high-temperature decomposition/hydrolysis of sulfur-containing biocides and corrosion inhibitors were studied, and the mechanisms of H2S generation were proposed. Although the results were definitive, sulfur-containing additives are not always applied. Therefore, in researching a more universal explanation of non-biogenic souring, an undeniable fact came to light: the water used in hydraulic fracturing is not degassed, thus it is saturated with oxygen at field conditions. As such, the oxygen present in the fluid can react with native H2S to generate elemental sulfur. Under downhole conditions elemental sulfur can react with hydrocarbons regenerating H2S. For this reason and to further prove this hypothesis, the kinetics and equilibrium products of sulfur-methanol reaction in aqueous conditions was studied under various downhole conditions e.g. temperature, pressure, pH and salinity.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectShale gasen_US
dc.subjecthydrogen sulfideen_US
dc.subjectHydraulic fracturingen_US
dc.subject.classificationEducation--Industrialen_US
dc.subject.classificationEngineering--Chemicalen_US
dc.titleReactions involving fracturing chemical additives with implication in delayed H2S productionen_US
dc.typedoctoral thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultyScienceen_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineChemistryen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBirss, Viola I.
dc.contributor.committeememberRoesler, Roland
dc.contributor.committeememberKimura, Susana Y.
dc.contributor.committeememberPlata, Desirée L.
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrueen_US


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