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dc.contributor.advisorKreitzer, Linda
dc.contributor.authorTanchak, Sherri Lynn
dc.date2020-06
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-24T16:33:43Z
dc.date.available2020-01-24T16:33:43Z
dc.date.issued2020-01-21
dc.identifier.citationTanchak, S. L. (2020). Unraveling How Social Workers Recover from Workplace Bullying Through Rediscovering Self (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/111550
dc.description.abstractSocial workers are increasingly sharing stories about witnessing and experiencing the injustice of workplace bullying across varied practice environments. Inherent in many stories are themes of discrimination, trauma, betrayal, anger, shame, and loss. Workplace bullying is essentially an abuse of power within the workplace. In the current workplace bullying literature, there is a disproportionately high representation of quantitative studies that describe and measure the nature, scope and prevalence of workplace bullying and its impact on the physical health, emotional well-being, social relationships, and work performance of targets and bystanders. Although this repository is rich with descriptive knowledge, it lacks the voices and experiences of workplace bullying targets. The purpose of this dissertation study is to examine how social workers recover from WPB. Ecological systems theory and socialist feminist theory provide a theoretical framework to guide this research. By utilizing constructivist grounded theory methodology, 13 registered social workers with active membership with the Alberta College of Social Workers, Canada were interviewed by semi-structured open-ended questions about their experiences of workplace bullying recovery. Four key themes emerged from the data: awareness, responses, impacts and rediscovering self. The findings inform a unique description of workplace bullying recovery and have been adopted into a conceptual framework to illustrate the social processes of workplace bullying recovery. A discussion of key findings of this study along with recommendations for social work educators, professional social work regulatory associations and clinicians working with WPB targets conclude this dissertation.en_US
dc.language.isoengen_US
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.en_US
dc.subjectBullyingen_US
dc.subjectWorkplace Bullyingen_US
dc.subjectSocial Workersen_US
dc.subjectRecoveryen_US
dc.subjectSocial Worken_US
dc.subjectWorkplace Bullying Recoveryen_US
dc.subject.classificationSocial Worken_US
dc.subject.classificationOccupational Health and Safetyen_US
dc.subject.classificationPsychologyen_US
dc.titleUnraveling How Social Workers Recover from Workplace Bullying Through Rediscovering Selfen_US
dc.typedoctoral thesisen_US
dc.publisher.facultySocial Worken_US
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)en_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSocial Worken_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgaryen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCrowder, Rachael
dc.contributor.committeememberNicholas, David Bruce
ucalgary.item.requestcopyfalseen_US


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.