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dc.contributor.advisorShinnie, Peter L.
dc.contributor.authorLahren, Larry Alan
dc.coverage.spatial2000002584en
dc.coverage.spatial2000002585en
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-19T20:03:22Z
dc.date.available2005-07-19T20:03:22Z
dc.date.issued1976
dc.identifier82480964en
dc.identifier.citationLahren, L. A. (1976). The Myers-Hindman site: an exploratory study of human occupation patterns in the Upper Yellowstone Valley from 7000 B.C. to A.D. 1200 (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/14871en_US
dc.identifier.other82480964en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/13245
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 183-195.en
dc.description.abstractThis exploratory research project was designed to create new knowledge about some of the hunter-gatherer adaptation patterns in the Upper Yellowstone Valley and the Northern Rocky Mountains. The study begins with the working assumption that the Northern Rocky Mountains are a distinct archaeological macro-environment that must be investigated through regional research designs. The Upper Yellowstone Valley was selected as one of these regions, and the Myers­Hindman site, an open camp in the Mountain Flanks Life Zone, was desig­nated for excavation. The resultant data base from these excavations consists of seven identified settlement units which cover a time span from about 7000 B.C. to A.D. 1200, a sample of some 6,610 artifactual specimens. and a faunal assemblage of 600 elements representing fifteen large- and small-game species. Analyses of these data, plus those from the valley in general, indicate that the region has seen continuity in man-environmental relations for at least the past 9000 years. Although numerous specific and general questions will need resolution through additional research in various areas, the present data base provides enough inferential power to suggest alternatives to the reconstructions of Northern Rocky Mountain prehistory as suggested by Husted (the Western Macro-Tradition) and Swanson (the Bitterroot Pattern).
dc.format.extentxv, 195 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccF 737 Y4 L24 1976 Microficheen
dc.subject.lcshYellowstone River Valley, Montana - Antiquities
dc.subject.lcshIndians of North America - Montana - Antiquities
dc.subject.lcshExcavations (Archaeology) - Montana
dc.titleThe Myers-Hindman site: an exploratory study of human occupation patterns in the Upper Yellowstone Valley from 7000 B.C. to A.D. 1200
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/14871
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy (PhD)
thesis.degree.disciplineArchaeology
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccF 737 Y4 L24 1976 Microficheen
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesPLen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleasenoen
ucalgary.item.requestcopyTRUE
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 264 82480964


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.