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dc.contributor.advisorNielsen, Kai E.
dc.contributor.authorJanowski, James Dale, 1960-
dc.date.accessioned2005-07-21T21:06:57Z
dc.date.available2005-07-21T21:06:57Z
dc.date.issued1985
dc.identifier.citationJanowski, J. D. (1985). Human nature, revolution, and the state: Marx and Bakunin on socialist society (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/20116en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0315220368en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/23351
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 116-118.en
dc.description.abstractThe debate between Karl Marx and Michael Bakunin over the correct road to socialism turns on their respective views of the state. In this thesis I argue that their disagreement can most fundamentally be cashed out in terms of the divergent conceptions of human nature that each holds. Contra the claims of some philosophers, Marx does indeed have a theory of human nature. This theory is separable into two parts: human nature in general, and human nature as historically conditioned. Against Marx's view, Bakunin believes that certain features of human nature obtain trans-historically. He claims that human beings are characterized by instincts for both revolution and socialism, as well as an instinctual love of power. Flowing from these differing views, I argue, are the varying conceptions of post-revolutionary society that each proffers. The dictatorship of the proletariat presupposes the mutable nature of ideological categories and the development of revolutionary consciousness in response to capitalism's imminent demise. Bakunin's critique of the proletarian state, and his more general critique of the state per se, are each founded on the idea that a lust for power is a human nature based constant. His positive alternative is designed to forestall the activation of this lust. In the end I make two points. First, Bakunin's view of human nature subverts his libertarian program: if love of power is an inviolable feature of humanity, socialism is not a real option. Second, Marx's view is the more perspicuous. If the fledgling society is to survive, a state apparatus will doubtless be necessary immediately following the revolution. And the people at its helm will not be power-lusters.
dc.format.extentvi, 118 leaves ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subject.lccB 3305 M74 J34 1986en
dc.subject.lcshMan
dc.subject.lcshMarx, Karl, 1818-1883
dc.subject.lcshBakunin, Mikhail Aleksandrovich, 1814-1876
dc.subject.lcshSocialism
dc.titleHuman nature, revolution, and the state: Marx and Bakunin on socialist society
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/20116
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Arts
thesis.degree.nameMA
thesis.degree.disciplinePhilosophy
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccB 3305 M74 J34 1986en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesoffsiteen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleasenoen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 547 215772150


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.