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dc.contributor.advisorWoudsma, Clarence
dc.contributor.authorSchwab, Barbara L.
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-08T19:57:07Z
dc.date.available2005-08-08T19:57:07Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationSchwab, B. L. (2003). Graph theoretic methods for examining landscape connectivity and spatial movement patterns: application to the FMF grizzly bear research project (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/12335en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612874214en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/39956
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 130-139en
dc.description.abstractMaintaining movement connections across fragmented landscapes is important for the long-term conservation of grizzly bear populations. The focus of this thesis is on applying graph theoretic methods in conjunction with RS, GIS and GPS to study connectivity associated with female grizzly bears in the Yellowhead Ecosystem, Alberta. Centroids of habitat patches provided the basis for graph nodes. Edges representing connections or movement paths between nodes were created using Least-Cost Path (LCP) modeling. Four alternative permeability surfaces were employed to generate functional linkages between habitat patches. Graph structures were developed using 1999 / 2000 GPS data and validated with 2001 I 2002 GPS data for grizzly bears at two spatial scales (individual and landscape levels). Final graph structures were analyzed to quantify connectivity levels and visually explore spatial movement patterns. Results demonstrated the graph theoretic model not only provides measurements related to connectivity but also identifies potential movement corridors across landscapes.
dc.format.extentxiii, 180 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleGraph theoretic methods for examining landscape connectivity and spatial movement patterns: application to the FMF grizzly bear research project
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/12335
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science
thesis.degree.nameMS
thesis.degree.nameMSc
thesis.degree.disciplineGeography
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2003 S39en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1471 520708906


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.