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dc.contributor.advisorHarper, Thomas L.
dc.contributor.authorDickout, Dustin
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T16:55:38Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T16:55:38Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationDickout, D. (2004). Embracing the dark: planning for nightlife in the beltline (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/12327en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41456
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 83-89en
dc.descriptionSome pages are in colour.en
dc.description.abstractThis MDP is an ethnographic study about urban nightlife with liquor establishments as the focus. The project's nature is conceptual and abstract with few existing conventional precedents to draw upon. In addition, the methodology employed is largely based on participatory and first person experiences. Nightlife, in the form of bars and nightclubs, is a valuable component of city life not only because it evokes pleasurable sensations among its participants but also because it re-enforces a city's cosmopolitan edge. However, enforced policies and regulations often mediate and dilute these experiences. This inherent tension creates 'experiential gaps' between the participants in terms of communication, language, and policy deficiencies. These gaps make nightlife planning difficult; what constitutes appropriate planning procedure is unclear. In Calgary, nightlife is planned for only after successive problems arise which cannot be ignored any longer. This approach is reactive and re-enforces nightlife's image, as more of a nuisance than a benefit. The Beltline, the neighbourhood south of Calgary's downtown core, is the study area. Nightlife planning should be included in the Beltline's development plans in order to create diverse and vibrant 'live-work-play' inner-city environments. Research for this project is built on the theory and principles of 2nd Generation CPTED (Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design). This serves as an appropriate planning model through its capacity to include all affected participants, promote open and equitable dialogue, and uphold the notions of mutual respect and trust. Two case studies -Street SW (Radio Block) in Calgary and Vancouver's Comprehensive Hours of Service Policy -investigate nightlife's impacts on the urban landscape. In order to gain primary insight about the nightlife question, a number of key informant interviews were conducted with involved participants. Recommendations suggest measures which could encourage open dialogue between participants and clarify the present ambiguity clouding nightlife planning. KEYWORDS -Nightlife, The Beltline, Liminal(ity), 2nd Generation CPTED, Dynamic Facilitation, Experience, Safetyen
dc.format.extentiv, 90 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleEmbracing the dark: planning for nightlife in the beltline
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.facultyEnvironmental Design
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/12327
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Environmental Design
thesis.degree.nameMEDes
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1497 520492014


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.