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dc.contributor.advisorJacob, Christian
dc.contributor.authorHoar, Ricardo
dc.date.accessioned2005-08-16T17:02:47Z
dc.date.available2005-08-16T17:02:47Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationHoar, R. (2004). Multi-agent modeling and analysis of pedestrian and vehicular traffic (Unpublished master's thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/22658en_US
dc.identifier.isbn0612976521en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1880/41601
dc.descriptionBibliography: p. 93-98en
dc.description.abstractEvaluating urban infrastructures through computer models is a useful way of gath­ering feedback and improving a proposed design before finally implementing it in concrete. Many current models focus on vehicular traffic, to the detriment of pedes­trians. To address this shortcoming, this thesis contributes a multi-agent model of vehicular and pedestrian traffic, where agents can plan, adapt and execute, produc­ing statistical feedback, and an intuitive visualization. This includes a description of how the environment is represented and how the agents plan and execute. Through the use of a software prototype, analysis of traffic flow is explored in several simple scenarios, highlighting the effect of agent variations. Through a model of the Uni­versity campus, a more realistic and holistic scenario is analysed, demonstrating the applicability and limitations of the model.en
dc.format.extentxii, 109 leaves : ill. ; 30 cm.en
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.titleMulti-agent modeling and analysis of pedestrian and vehicular traffic
dc.typemaster thesis
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/22658
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Science (MSc)
thesis.degree.disciplineComputer Science
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
dc.identifier.lccAC1 .T484 2004 H63en
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen
ucalgary.thesis.notesUARCen
ucalgary.thesis.uarcreleaseyen
ucalgary.item.requestcopytrue
ucalgary.thesis.accessionTheses Collection 58.002:Box 1507 520492024


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University of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.