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dc.contributor.advisorMaundy, Brent
dc.contributor.authorFreeborn, Todd
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-13T21:59:28Z
dc.date.available2014-03-15T07:00:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-13
dc.date.submitted2013en
dc.identifier.citationFreeborn, T. (2013). Indirect Measurement of Fractional Impedances (Unpublished doctoral thesis). University of Calgary, Calgary, AB. doi:10.11575/PRISM/26504en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11023/1195
dc.description.abstractThis thesis investigates the measurement of fractional-order parameters that describe the electrical impedance of tissues and devices without requiring direct impedance measurements. Concepts from fractional calculus are imported to develop fractional circuit theory and derive the voltage and current excited step responses and magnitude responses of the single-dispersion Cole impedance model which is widely used in biomedicine and biology. Using these responses a numerical graph-fitting and non-linear least squares fitting routine have been applied to MATLAB simulations to assess the accuracy of this approach to extract the fractional impedance parameters that describe this model. Experimentally collected data from fruit tissues and ideal Cole models validate these methods. These fractional calculus concepts are further applied to develop the circuit theory to describe the current excited step response and magnitude response of the double-dispersion Cole impedance model. MATLAB and PSPICE simulations of assess the accuracy of this approach to extract the fractional impedance parameters that describe this model. Experimentally collected data from the current-excited step response and voltage excited magnitude response of apples validates these methods. Finally, the fractional circuit theory is applied to develop the expression for the voltage-excited step-response of a fractional model for a supercapacitor which is then used with non-linear least squares method extract the impedance parameters that characterize the model. This method is validated experimentally using results collected from low capacity supercapacitors with manufacturer ratings of 0.33 F, 1 F, and 1.5 F and high capacity supercapacitors with 1500 F and 3000 F manufacturer ratings.en_US
dc.language.isoeng
dc.rightsUniversity of Calgary graduate students retain copyright ownership and moral rights for their thesis. You may use this material in any way that is permitted by the Copyright Act or through licensing that has been assigned to the document. For uses that are not allowable under copyright legislation or licensing, you are required to seek permission.
dc.subjectEngineering--Electronics and Electrical
dc.subject.classificationFractional calculusen_US
dc.subject.classificationFractional impedanceen_US
dc.titleIndirect Measurement of Fractional Impedances
dc.typedoctoral thesis
dc.publisher.facultyGraduate Studies
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Calgaryen
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.11575/PRISM/26504
thesis.degree.nameDoctor of Philosophy
thesis.degree.namePhD
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineering
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Calgary
atmire.migration.oldid1679
dc.publisher.placeCalgaryen


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