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    Open Access
    How context links to best practice use in long-term care homes: a mixed methods study
    (2024-06-07) Duan, Yinfei; Wang, Jing; Lanham, Holly J.; Berta, Whitney; Chamberlain, Stephanie A.; Hoben, Matthias; Choroschun, Katharina; Iaconi, Alba; Song, Yuting; Perez, Janelle S.; Shrestha, Shovana; Beeber, Anna; Anderson, Ruth A.; Hayduk, Leslie; Cummings, Greta G.; Norton, Peter G.; Estabrooks, Carole A.
    Abstract Background Context (work environment) plays a crucial role in implementing evidence-based best practices within health care settings. Context is multi-faceted and its complex relationship with best practice use by care aides in long-term care (LTC) homes are understudied. This study used an innovative approach to investigate how context elements interrelate and influence best practice use by LTC care aides. Methods In this secondary analysis study, we combined coincidence analysis (a configurational comparative method) and qualitative analysis to examine data collected through the Translating Research in Elder Care (TREC) program. Coincidence analysis of clinical microsystem (care unit)-level data aggregated from a survey of 1,506 care aides across 36 Canadian LTC homes identified configurations (paths) of context elements linked consistently to care aides’ best practices use, measured with a scale of conceptual research use (CRU). Qualitative analysis of ethnographic case study data from 3 LTC homes (co-occurring with the survey) further informed interpretation of the configurations. Results Three paths led to very high CRU at the care unit level: very high leadership; frequent use of educational materials; or a combination of very high social capital (teamwork) and frequent communication between care aides and clinical educators or specialists. Conversely, 2 paths led to very low CRU, consisting of 3 context elements related to unfavorable conditions in relationships, resources, and formal learning opportunities. Our qualitative analysis provided insights into how specific context elements served as facilitators or barriers for best practices. This qualitative exploration was especially helpful in understanding 2 of the paths, illustrating the pivotal role of leadership and the function of teamwork in mitigating the negative impact of time constraints. Conclusions Our study deepens understanding of the complex interrelationships between context elements and their impact on the implementation of best practices in LTC homes. The findings underscore that there is no singular, universal bundle of context-related elements that enhance or hinder best practice use in LTC homes.
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    Open Access
    Key ingredients for successful collaboration in health research: perspectives of patient research partners
    (2024-06-05) Bruce, Marcia; Yogaratnam, Karthika; Suryaprakash, Nitya; Barker, Karis L.; Marshall, Deborah A.
    Abstract Background There are increasing publications on meaningful collaboration between researchers and patient research partners (PRPs), but fewer publications of such work from the PRP perspective using an evaluation framework. Our aim is to present our own perspectives and reflections on meaningful collaboration as PRPs working on a qualitative research study. Main body We were part of a study team that comprised of PRPs, clinicians and academic researchers, and was led by a PRP. The team designed and conducted a qualitative study aimed at understanding how patients make decisions around tapering of biologics for inflammatory bowel disease. The study was conducted online. The PRP lead was trained in qualitative methodology through a one-year certificate program called Patient and Community Engagement Research offered through the University of Calgary Continuing Education. We had received patient-oriented research training and qualitative research training prior to this project. Team members were assigned tasks by our group lead based on member interests and willingness. Some group members were part of the Strategy for Patient-Oriented Research, Inflammation, Microbiome, and Alimentation: Gastro-Intestinal and Neuropsychiatric Effects Network, one of five chronic disease networks in the Strategy for Patient Oriented Research initiative of the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. We describe the five key ingredients to successful collaboration based on our experiences and reflections utilizing the Experience-Reflection-Action Cycle as our framework. The five key ingredients that we identified were: inclusiveness, goal and role clarity, multi-level training and capacity building, shared decision making, and a supportive team lead. Conclusion Overall, our experience was positive. With successful collaboration came an increased level of trust, commitment and performance. There is a need for more studies with diverse PRPs in different settings to validate and/or identify additional factors to improve collaboration in patient-oriented research.
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    Open Access
    Intra-abdominal infections survival guide: a position statement by the Global Alliance For Infections In Surgery
    (2024-06-08) Sartelli, Massimo; Barie, Philip; Agnoletti, Vanni; Al-Hasan, Majdi N.; Ansaloni, Luca; Biffl, Walter; Buonomo, Luis; Blot, Stijn; Cheadle, William G.; Coimbra, Raul; De Simone, Belinda; Duane, Therese M.; Fugazzola, Paola; Giamarellou, Helen; Hardcastle, Timothy C.; Hecker, Andreas; Inaba, Kenji; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W.; Labricciosa, Francesco M.; Leone, Marc; Martin-Loeches, Ignacio; Maier, Ronald V.; Marwah, Sanjay; Maves, Ryan C.; Mingoli, Andrea; Montravers, Philippe; Ordóñez, Carlos A.; Palmieri, Miriam; Podda, Mauro; Rello, Jordi; Sawyer, Robert G.; Sganga, Gabriele; Tattevin, Pierre; Thapaliya, Dipendra; Tessier, Jeffrey; Tolonen, Matti; Ulrych, Jan; Vallicelli, Carlo; Watkins, Richard R.; Catena, Fausto; Coccolini, Federico
    Abstract Intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospital settings worldwide. The cornerstones of IAI management include rapid, accurate diagnostics; timely, adequate source control; appropriate, short-duration antimicrobial therapy administered according to the principles of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics and antimicrobial stewardship; and hemodynamic and organ functional support with intravenous fluid and adjunctive vasopressor agents for critical illness (sepsis/organ dysfunction or septic shock after correction of hypovolemia). In patients with IAIs, a personalized approach is crucial to optimize outcomes and should be based on multiple aspects that require careful clinical assessment. The anatomic extent of infection, the presumed pathogens involved and risk factors for antimicrobial resistance, the origin and extent of the infection, the patient’s clinical condition, and the host’s immune status should be assessed continuously to optimize the management of patients with complicated IAIs.
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    Open Access
    Pediatric rheumatology education: the virtual frontier a review
    (2024-06-05) McColl, Jeanine; Mwizerwa, Oscar; Scott, Christiaan; Tse, Shirley M.; Foster, Helen E.
    Abstract Background Many children with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases are unrecognized. Identifying these children requires health care provider awareness, knowledge, and skills to recognize disease features and how (and when) to refer to specialist care. The aim of this paper is to highlight the need for better access to health care, review the essential role that education and virtual care play to address unmet need in low resource areas and especially to expand workforce capacity. Using collaborative partnerships, virtual platforms, and innovative assessment methods, musculoskeletal care and education can be delivered to reach a greater audience than ever before. Increased awareness through multiple initiatives and readily available resources are imperative to improve global rheumatology care. Conclusion The needs of children with rheumatic diseases and musculoskeletal conditions are vastly underserved around the world resulting in preventable morbidity and mortality. Expanded implementation of virtual education and e-health care platforms provides an opportunity to increase access to care for children globally.
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    Open Access
    The role of internet addiction and academic resilience in predicting the mental health of high school students in Tehran
    (2024-06-04) Latifian, Maryam; Aarabi, Mahta A.; Esmaeili, Sahar; Abdi, Kianoush; Raheb, Ghoncheh
    Abstract Background The World Health Organization defines mental health as a combination of two dimensions: the negative dimension, or negative mental health, which indicates the presence of mental disorders, symptoms, and problems, and the positive dimension, or positive mental health, which includes emotions and positive personal characteristics such as self-esteem, resilience against environmental challenges, a sense of integrity, and self-efficacy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of internet addiction and academic resilience in predicting the mental health of high school students in Tehran, Iran. Method The research method employed was a survey. 758 people participated in the study, and the samples consisted of high school students in Tehran during the academic year 2022–2023. The process of collecting information was carried out by distributing the questionnaire link through virtual networks and schools. The research utilized Young’s Internet Addiction Test, Samuels’ Academic Resilience Inventory, and Goldberg’s Mental Health Questionnaire as the research tools. Statistical tests, including Pearson’s correlation and multiple regression analysis, were employed to investigate the relationships between variables. Result The effect of internet addiction on mental health (ß=0.39) is negative and significant at the 0.001 level, while the effect of academic resilience on mental health (ß=0.66) is positive and significant at the 0.001 level. These two variables collectively predict 53% of the variance in students’ mental health. This indicates that as internet addiction increases among students, their mental health significantly decreases, whereas higher levels of academic resilience correspond to higher mental health. Conclusions This study has elucidated the role of internet addiction and academic resilience in predicting the mental health of high school students in Tehran. Given the significance of adolescent mental health, it is imperative for healthcare professionals and other stakeholders to develop intervention and prevention models to address mental health crises and plan for the enhancement of adolescent mental health.