Taylor Institute for Teaching and Learning Research & Publications

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Now showing 1 - 5 of 17
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    Open Access
    Institutional collaborations to support undergraduate research as experiential learning
    (2023-11-10) Flanagan, Kyla; Stowe, Lisa; Summers, Mindi; Murphy, James E.
    Changing a campus culture to have experiential learning become essential to the student experience requires extensive buy-in and support from the campus community (Stowe & O'Connell, 2022). The Office of Experiential Learning at the University of Calgary supports experiential learning institutionally, with a bold target of all students having at least two high-quality experiential learning opportunities during their academic studies (Kaipainen et al., 2020). At UCalgary, a large, research-intensive institution, undergraduate research is a signature form of experiential learning where students engage in hands-on research in collaboration with researchers. There are numerous benefits to students participating in research (for example, see Lopatto et al., 2020); however, a lack of incentives and training can limit faculty members' willingness to engage in pedagogical change (Brownell and Tanner 2017). In this panel discussion, we will describe the landscape and context of undergraduate research at UCalgary, programming that has supported more than 3500 students engaging in research initiatives over the last three years, and institutional-level collaborations that have facilitated a culture shift, increasing undergraduate research in curricular and co-curricular experiences. As a vital part of our work, we will describe extensive research to understand barriers to accessing experiential learning opportunities for deserving equity groups and ameliorative actions we have taken as a campus to increase accessibility (Stowe et al., 2022). Finally, we will discuss the challenges and successes faced in expanding undergraduate research and experiential learning opportunities in our context institutionally and explore with participants how our experiences may translate to other institutional contexts.
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    Open Access
    Ungrading and Alternative Assessment
    (University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, 2023-04-28) Stommel, Jesse
    "Ungrading" means raising an eyebrow at grades as a systemic practice, distinct from simply not grading. The word is a present participle, an ongoing process, not a static set of practices. Too many of our approaches to grades treat students like they’re interchangeable and fail to recognize their complexity. Can we imagine flexible approaches to assessment, pedagogies which center intrinsic more than extrinsic motivation, encouraging and supporting learning, rather than policing behavior? We have to design to ensure a focus on equity, diversity, inclusion and accessibility, especially for those who identify within equity-deserving groups, including women, Indigenous peoples, visible/racialized minorities, persons with disabilities, and people who identify as LGBTQ2S+. This workshop will balance presentation with practical activities and discussion.
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    Open Access
    The Role of Intentional Equity and Care in Collective Transformation
    (University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, 2023-04-28) Bali, Maha
    In education, change often comes to us either as a crisis "shock" (like COVID, or ChatGPT) or a slower "slide" (like the return to in-person teaching after many months of remote for many around the world). It is our responsibility as educators and educational institutions to "harness the shocks and direct the slides" (adrienne maree brown, 2017, p. 80). In this session, we explore the importance of centering equity and care in our approaches to addressing institutional change in order to create sustainable collective transformation that includes all stakeholders in the educational process, especially the most marginalized. We will discuss the micro-elements like relationships among teachers and their students, as well as the systemic elements and allyships that are necessary for our strategies to be truly transformative and cultivate socially just care.
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    Open Access
    Academic Integrity in an Age of Educational Transformation (or_ Why Robots Won't Inherit the Earth)
    (University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, 2023-04-28) Eaton, Sarah
    Join us for an interactive session in which you, the participants, will share ideas and effective practices about what works to help students (1) understand what academic integrity is; (2) analyze which aspects of academic integrity need to transform in the age of artificial intelligence, which remain constant, and why; and (3) connect academic integrity to ethical-decision making in daily life beyond the classroom. There is no magic bullet to ensure that students uphold academic integrity and there is no “one size fits all” approach. Instead, in this facilitated session, we share ideas, resources, and tips that can be used in different contexts. You will come away having been inspired by academic and professional peers with concrete ideas to apply in their own teaching practice. Most of all, you may find fears about threats to academic integrity from emerging technologies diminished. By the end of this session engaged participants will: • Understand the connection between academic integrity in the classroom and ethical-decision making in daily life. • Analyze the impact of transformative technologies such as artificial intelligence on teaching, learning, assessment, and academic integrity. • Gain new strategies and ideas to use in teaching and assessment.
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    Open Access
    Stories from the Pandemic: A Métissage on Digital Environments, Embodiment, and Indigenous Education
    (University of Calgary Conference on Postsecondary Learning and Teaching, 2023-04-27) Hanson, Aubrey
    Through a métissage or interweaving of vignettes, reflections, and scholarly engagement, this presentation draws on Hanson’s experiences over the past few years to consider the topic of collective transformation. Hanson explores the transformation precipitated by the unexpected years of online life starting with the outbreak of COVID-19, alongside the ongoing transformation called for in Indigenous Education. The work of weaving Indigenous ways of knowing, being, and doing into teaching and learning in Western institutions requires perseverance and calls us to grapple with complex frameworks like decolonization, reconciliation, and relationality. Meanwhile, the experiences of the past few years have called for adaptability in response to the material realities of the online era. Set amidst the pandemic, these considerations touch on themes of embodiment, land, climate, culture, consciousness, and uncertainty.